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Apple Varieties 4
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 apple varieties
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 Benoni
Benoni
Grown by: Herb Teichman
Eau Clair, Michigan 1999

from Apples of New York- S.A. Beach:

"Benoni is a fine dessert apple, very attractive in appearance and excellent in quality but not large enough to be a good market variety. The tree comes into bearing moderately young and yields fair to good crops biennially. It begins to ripen early in august and its season extends into September.

 

At A Glance
name: Benoni
origin: Dedham, Massachusetts
date: before 1832
parentage: unknown
harvest: early August
season: September
Historical
"Originated in Dedham, Massachusetts, where the original tree was still standing in 1848. It was introduced to notice by Mr. E. M. Richards shortly before 1832. It is highly esteemed throughout the country and is generally listed by nurserymen throughout the middle and northern portions of the apple-growing regions of this continent.

Tree
"Tree rather large, vigorous. Form erect to somewhat roundish, dense. Twigs moderately long, straight, slender; internodes medium. Bark olive-green, shaded with light reddish-brown, lightly coated with scarf-skin, pubescent. Lenticels scattering, medium, oblong, slightly raised. Buds deeply set in bark, medium size, plump, obtuse, appressed, slightly pubescent.

Fruit
"Fruit medium to rather small. Form roundish inclined to conic, faintly ribbed toward the apex; sides unequal. Stem short to very short, slender. Cavity acute, rather narrow, moderately deep, wavy, greenish-russet. Calyx rather small to above medium, partly open, slightly pubescent. Basin medium in width and depth, abrupt, somewhat wrinkled.
"Skin smooth, orange-yellow partly covered with lively red striped with deep carmine. Dots scattering, minute, whitish..
"Stamens basal.
"Core small to medium, axile; cells closed; core lines meeting. Carpels roundish, slightly elongated, emarginate. Seeds few, dark brown, medium in size, plump, obtuse.
"Flesh yellow, firm, crisp, fine-grained, tender, juicy, pleasant subacid, good to very good.
"Season August and early September."


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 Black Gilliflower
Black Gilliflower (Sheepnose)
Grown by: Herb Teichman
Eau Clair, Michigan 1999

from Apples of New York- S.A. Beach:

"A dessert apple which is very distinct in color, form and flavor. The color is yellowish or greenish, sometimes almost complete covered with red, which in highly colored specimens becomes dull purplish and very dark, as recognized in the name "Black" Gilliflower. The color of the fruit is often much darker than it appears in the accompanying plate. The flesh at its best is but moderately juicy and soon becomes dry, but it has a peculiar aroma which is pleasing to many. It is not sour enough to be very valuable for cooking, but it is sometimes used for baking. It is fast becoming obsolete in most parts of the state, but in some sections the planting of it in commercial orchards is being extended because it is found profitable to grow it in limited quantities for southern markets. On good soil the tree is a good, vigorous grower and a reliable cropper. The apples grow fair and smooth and there is little loss from unmarketable fruit.
At A Glance
name: Black Gilliflower
origin: American (?)
date: earlier than 1800
parentage: unknown
harvest: October
season: October-January
Historical
"Black Gilliflower is supposed to be an American variety. It was brought into the central and western portions of the state more than a hundred years ago by the early settlers. It is evident that it was known in Connecticut as early as the latter part of the eighteenth century. Manning mentions it in 1841 under the name Red Gilliflower and Hovey described it in 1850 under the same name, giving Black Gilliflower as a synonym. It has generally been known under the simple name Gilliflower, which name usually appears in the market quotation of this variety.

Tree
"Tree large, moderately vigorous. Form rather upright spreading with moderately open top. Twigs long, slender, pubescent; internodes short to medium. Bark dark olive-green and reddish-brown with thin gray scarf-skin. Lenticels rather numerous, small to medium, roundish or elongated, raised. Buds medium, obtuse or acute, quite pubescent, appressed. Leaves rather long, medium to above medium in size.

Fruit
"Fruit medium to large, seldom very large; very uniform in size and shape. Form long ovate to oblong conic, somewhat ribbed; axis sometimes a little oblique. Stem medium to long, moderately thick. Cavity usually acuminate, rather wide, moderately deep to deep, sometimes lipped but usually symmetrical with red russet or greenish outspreading rays. Calyx medium or below, closed. Basin often oblique, usually very shallow and obtuse, varying sometimes to moderately deep and abrupt, furrowed and much wrinkled.
"Skin thick, tough, nearly smooth; yellow or greenish-yellow, striped or mostly covered with red, deepening to dark purplish-red or almost black, obscurely striped with darker crimson, and with streaks of bluish-gray scarf-skin, especially toward the cavity, gibing almost the effect of a dull bloom. Dots numerous, fray, rather small, not conspicuous, somewhat rough. Prevailing effect in highly colored specimens dull dark purplish.
"Calyx tube large, wide, cone-shape or funnel-form. Stamens median or above.
"Core large decidedly axile, closed; core lines somewhat clasping. Carpels very long ovate, tapering both ways, emarginate, much tufted. Seeds often abortive; when well developed they are above medium, acute to acuminate, somewhat tufted.
"Flesh whitish or slightly tinged with yellow, firm, rather tender, rather coarse, moderately juicy eventually becoming dry, mild subacid, rich, peculiarly aromatic, good for dessert and special markets.
"Season October to January or February."
 


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